Category Newborns

Touch, holding and massage for your premature baby in the NICU
Newborns

Touch, holding and massage for your premature baby in the NICU

Touch and premature babies Touch is the first of a baby's senses to mature. Touching your premature baby will help him feel cared for and supported. Touch can be the beginning of your relationship with your premature baby , and it's a good way to bond with your baby. Premature babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have many people touching them in many different ways.

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Newborns

Premature birth: questions to ask

Why it's good to ask questions about premature birth It's completely understandable if you feel worried about yourself or your baby in the lead-up to a premature birth. These worries might feel even bigger if you have to go through a birth you haven't planned in a hospital you don't know. You might have less privacy and more discomfort than you expected.
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Newborns

Helping premature babies feel calm in the NICU

Why premature babies feel stressed in the NICU Premature babies can experience different kinds of stress in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). They can have acute stress and pain from having heel pricks, being ventilated, having an IV inserted or even just being washed. Living in a noisy and bright environment and having lots of people coming and going all the time is also very uncomfortable for tiny and extremely sensitive premature babies.
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Newborns

New baby checklist: home and baby equipment

Baby checklist: preparing your home Getting your home ready can be a good way to help you, your partner and your other children prepare for your new baby's arrival. Where baby sleeps A baby can fit into a corner of your room if you haven't the time or space to create a new room. In fact, you can reduce the risk of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) by sleeping your baby in a cot in the same room as you for the first 6-12 months.
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Newborns

After premature birth: your feelings

Your feelings after premature birth: what to expect A premature birth can shake your confidence in the world. It's normal to feel many mixed and sometimes conflicting emotions. There are positive emotions , of course, like joy and love for your newborn. But it's common to wonder about what happened and what caused the early birth.
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Newborns

Newborn sleep routines

Newborn sleep: some basics Newborns spend most of their time asleep. They're programmed to sleep in short bursts of about 2-3 hours between feeds, night and day. Your baby will need your attention during the night for feeding and settling for up to the first six months. Some babies keep waking even after this.
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Newborns

Premature labour, birth and babies

Premature birth: the basics Pregnancy lasts an average of 40 weeks (normally between 38 and 42 weeks). A premature birth is when a baby is born before 37 weeks. So a baby born at 36 weeks and 6 days is officially premature. The degree of prematurity is often described by gestational age as: extremely premature - from 23-28 weeks very premature - 28-32 weeks moderately premature - 32-34 weeks late preterm - 34-37 weeks.
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Newborns

Premature birth: Sherry's story

Sherry's story: from premature birth to bonding 'It was a Friday morning. 'It was no ordinary day. It was David's birthday, and we had plans to celebrate that evening with the usual gang. I was just under 33 weeks pregnant and hadn't been able to button my overalls completely that morning. I had mild stomach cramps before I got out of bed but they passed and I thought nothing of it.
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Newborns

Premature babies: eight tips for family and friends

Supporting parents of premature babies Being the parents of a premature baby can be very stressful. Mums and dads of premature babies often go through a lot of emotional ups and downs in the early weeks and months of their babies' lives. When they get practical help and emotional support from family and friends, parents often cope a lot better with the experience.
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Newborns

Premature birth: mental and emotional preparation

Getting mentally and emotionally ready for premature birth If you know you might have a premature birth and a baby who'll need to stay in hospital, it's normal for you and your partner to feel a range of emotions. For example, you might feel joy, love, helplessness, sadness, guilt, fear or worry. It can help to read up on premature births and premature babies.
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